Archive for July, 2009

Tropical Storm Lana Discussion 6 NWS

July 31, 2009

WTPA41 PHFO 312057
TCDCP1
TROPICAL STORM LANA DISCUSSION NUMBER 6
NWS CENTRAL PACIFIC HURRICANE CENTER HONOLULU HI EP062009
1100 AM HST FRI JUL 31 2009
AFTER ORGANIZATION DETERIORATED EARLY LAST NIGHT…A BURST OF
CENTRAL CONVECTION AFTER 1200 UTC HELPED REINVIGORATE LANA. DVORAK
ESTIMATES FROM CPHC AND SAB CAME IN AT T3.5…OR 55 KT AND AN AMSU
INTENSITY ESTIMATE AT 1437 UTC ALSO INDICATED 55 KT. BASED ON THIS
CONSENSUS…THE INITIAL INTENSITY WILL BE RAISED TO 55 KT. THE 37
GHZ SSMI PASS FROM 1610 UTC HELPED LOCATE THE SYSTEM CENTER JUST
EAST OF THE DEEP CONVECTION CENTROID. INFRARED AND VISIBLE
SATELLITE IMAGES SHOW LANA/S OUTFLOW IS BEING RESTRICTED TO THE
WEST AND SOUTHWEST. THIS INDICATES UPPER SOUTHWESTERLIES…AND
INCREASED VERTICAL SHEAR…ARE STARTING TO AFFECT THE CYCLONE.
LANA IS MOVING WESTWARD TO THE SOUTH OF A SUBTROPICAL RIDGE THAT
WILL BUILD WESTWARD OVER THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS. THIS WILL KEEP THE
CYCLONE TRACK GENERALLY TOWARD THE WEST TO WEST-NORTHWEST THROUGH
THE FORECAST PERIOD AND WELL SOUTH OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. THE
DYNAMICAL OBJECTIVE AIDS ARE TIGHTLY PACKED AND CONSISTENT WITH THE
PREVIOUS PACKAGE. THUS…THE CURRENT FORECAST FOLLOWS THE PREVIOUS
FORECAST AND IS CLOSE TO THE DYNAMICAL MODEL CONSENSUS…ESPECIALLY
THROUGH 72 HOURS.
IN TERMS OF INTENSITY…LANA MAY HAVE REACHED ITS PEAK. WHILE SST
VALUES ARE MORE THAN ADEQUATE…UPPER LEVEL SOUTHWESTERLIES ARE
EXPECTED TO INCREASE ALONG THE CYCLONE/S PROJECTED TRACK SO
VERTICAL SHEAR WILL TAKE ITS TOLL…ESPECIALLY FROM 24 TO 36
HOURS ONWARD. THE FORECAST FOLLOWS THE TREND OF THE ICON AND IVCN
WITH SLOW WEAKENING FROM 24 THROUGH 48 HOURS FOLLOWED BY A MORE
RAPID WEAKENING TO A REMNANT LOW BY 120 HOURS. IF VERTICAL WIND
SHEAR TAKES HOLD EARLIER…THE WEAKENING TREND WILL ALSO OCCUR
EARLIER.

FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INITIAL 31/2100Z 13.7N 147.7W 55 KT
12HR VT 01/0600Z 14.1N 150.0W 55 KT
24HR VT 01/1800Z 14.7N 152.9W 50 KT
36HR VT 02/0600Z 15.2N 155.7W 45 KT
48HR VT 02/1800Z 15.7N 158.3W 45 KT
72HR VT 03/1800Z 16.5N 163.8W 35 KT
96HR VT 04/1800Z 17.1N 169.5W 25 KT…DISSIPATING
120HR VT 05/1800Z 17.6N 175.6W 20 KT…REMNANT LOW

FORECASTER KODAMA

High Surf Advisory

July 31, 2009

HiGH SURF ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 PM HST SUNDAY… THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN HONOLULU HAS ISSUED A HIGH SURF ADVISORY…WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 6 AM TODAY TO 6 PM HST SUNDAY. SURF WILL BUILD TO HEIGHTS OF 6 TO 8 FEET TODAY. PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS… A HIGH SURF ADVISORY MEANS THAT HIGH SURF WILL AFFECT BEACHES IN THE ADVISORY AREA…PRODUCING RIP CURRENTS AND LOCALIZED BEACH EROSION.

Disaster Supply Kit

July 30, 2009

In case you are advised to seek a storm shelter keep this list and pack these essentials.

DISASTER SUPPLY KIT
Everyone in the state is advised to bring a disaster supply kit that includes 5 to 7 days worth of supplies. The Hurricane Evacuation Shelters are only intended to be a safe place to stay and will not have food or personal items on hand for volunteers or residents.

PERSONAL ITEMS
Driver’s License
Keep in a Waterproof Bag
Cash (ATMs may not work after the storm)

Checkbook

Credit Card

Copies of important documents
Social Security Card
Passport
Proof of Residence (deed or lease)
Insurance Information (Medical, Auto, Home, Life)
Birth Certificate
Marriage Certificate
Bank Account Numbers
Pin Numbers/Computer Passwords
Military Discharge Papers

Written List of Important Phone Numbers
Family Members
Friends
Doctors (including dentist and eye doctor)
Pharmacy
Insurance Companies and Policy Numbers
Remember, numbers stored in cell phones won’t be accessible when the power goes out and cell phones can’t be charged.
Extra set of house and car keys

COMFORT ITEMS

Sleeping Bag or Blanket
There will be no cots in the shelter
Pillow

HYGIENE ITEMS
Towel and Washcloth

Toothbrush

Toothpaste
Trail/hotel sizes that can be used and discarded are recommended. Please note, it is likely you will go several days without a shower in the Hurricane Evacuation Shelter, but these will be needed if you are unable to get back home after the storm passes.
Shampoo and Conditioner

Liquid Soap/Bath Gel

Deodorant

Razor and Shave Gel

Toilet Paper

Feminine Hygiene Products (tampons or pads)

Hand Sanitizer/Wet Wipes

FOOD AND FEEDING SUPPLIES – Remember: pack a 5 to 7 day supply that does not require refrigeration or cooking
Manual can and bottle opener

Plastic Utensils or Chopsticks

Cups

Plates

Paper Towels

Liquid Dish Soap

Zip Lock Bags

Aluminum foil or plastic wrap

Plastic containers with lids

Water
1 gallon per person per day for 5 to 7 days
Water Bottle with Belt Clip

Pack of spices, salt and pepper

Canned and Ready-To-Eat Non-Perishable Foods
Suggestions:
• Canned Foods:
 Tuna
 Canned Fruit or Veggies
 Beans
 Meat
• Dry Cereal
• Nuts and Dried Fruit
• Peanut Butter
• High-energy protein bars or snacks
• Beef Jerkey or similar protein item
• Tea or Instant Coffee
• Bottled or Canned Juice
• Comfort Foods:
 Cookies
 Hard Candy
 Sweetened Cereals
CLOTHING
Protective Clothing

Rain Poncho

Study Shoes (closed toe)

Hat

OTHER EQUIPMENT
Flashlight

Battery Operated Weather Radio

Extra Batteries

Multi-Purpose Tool

Cell Phone

Cell Phone Charger

Rescue Whistle

Duct Tape

Camera

FIRST AID SUPPLIES/MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
Prescription Medication and Instructions for Use

Non-Prescription Medication
Pain and Fever Relievers
Allergy Medication
Eye Drops
Anti-Diarrhea Medication
Laxatives
Antibiotic Ointment

First Aid Kit and reference guide

Eye Glasses

Contact Lenses, Solution and Carrying Case

Sunscreen

Bug Repellent

IF YOU HAVE CHILDREN
Diapers and Baby Wipes

Infant Formula

Toys or Activities to Keep Children Entertained in the Shelter
Pack items that will not require batteries or electricity

IF YOU HAVE PETS
Pet Food

Water

Portable Water and Food Bowl
We do not have vests to issue to all volunteers. Bring one if you have it. If you do not have a vest, try to wear a Red Cross and there may be a vest available at your shelter.
Pet Crate
One per pet
Towels

Blanket
For scooping up a fearful pet
Harness

Collar and ID Tags

Pet Medications and Instructions for Use

Recent photos of your pets
In case you need to make a “Lost Pet” poster
Photocopies of Pet Medical Records in a Waterproof Bag

For Dogs:
Long Leash
Yard Stake
Chew Toys and Toys
Cage Liner (2 weeks worth)

For Cats:
Disposable Litter Trays (e.g. aluminum roasting pans)
Cat Litter

Tropical Storm Lana

July 30, 2009

TROPICAL STORM LANA – VOLUNTEER AVAILABILITY REQUEST

(Please reply using link below)

SITUATION OVERVIEW – 7/30/09

As you may have seen on the news, a tropical storm system, Trocipal Storm Lana, has quickly developed southeast of the Big Island. At this time, it appears the current track of the storm will take it well south of the state. However, because the storm is moving so quickly, we want to make sure we are prepared in case the system suddenly takes a turn north towards the islands. We are sending this alert to ask volunteers to share their availability to help over the next few days if needed, and to remind you to make sure you and your families are prepared with a 5 to 7 day disaster supplies kit.

SHARE YOUR AVAILABILITY
Please use this online form to share your availability:
Red Cross volunteers Tropical Storm Lana
Even if you are not available, using this form to let us know will help save us time from making unnecessary phone calls. Using this link helps us download and organize replies quickly.
Again, please provide information on your availability using the link above as soon as possible.

HURRICANE PERPAREDNESS

Before you worry about helping others, please make sure you are prepared. Take the next couple of days to make sure you and your loved ones are hurricane ready. Make sure your family has a disaster kit assembled with 5-7 days worth of supplies. I have attached a list of recommended supplies for your kit.

UPDATES

We will provide updates if the storm’s path changes and the Red Cross activates for this storm.

Thank you so much for your help.

Jennifer Walter, Manager, Response and Preparedness, walterj@hawaiiredcross.org

Joe Hunkler, Volunteer Staffing Lead, dshr@hawaiiredcross.org

Invading Wasps Changing Haleakala

July 28, 2009

From Maui news
http://www.mauinews.com
HARRY EAGAR

ERIN WILSON photo Western yellowjacket wasps, Vespula pensylvanica, gather at a nest. The invading insects like high, lonely places, and at Haleakala they’re building nests the size of cars.

Invading wasps in Haleakala National Park, which in their home range make nests the size of a football, have grown nests “the size of a ’57 Buick.”

Research just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows a fascinating interplay in which the invaders are being shaped by their new environment, just as they are drastically changing the native ecosystem. Not only do the aliens – western yellowjacket wasps, Vespula pensylvanica – take advantage of the lack of cold winters to grow huge nests, they have taken to eating vertebrate meat as well as other insects – geckos and native shearwaters.

Erin Wilson, who has just completed a doctorate in biology at the University of California, San Diego, studied the yellowjackets at Haleakala and Hawaii Volcanoes national parks in 2006 and 2007. The yellowjackets have been a problem in the parks for years, but their new diet and their numbers were a surprise.

In a telephone interview from Acadia National Park in Maine, where she is vacationing, Wilson said the yellowjackets like high, lonely places.

They are hard to find, which is why the size of the nests – up to 600,000 individuals compared with a few thousand in a usual nest – escaped attention.

Along with Argentinian ants, the yellowjackets are among the most dangerous alien arthropod invaders of the park.

“It’s not just what they’re killing,” Wilson said. “They’re also collecting great amounts of nectar, drawing down the resources for anything else that might want to feed on it, whether it’s native insects or birds like the Hawaiian honeycreepers.”

The wasps do not attack and kill vertebrates, only scavenging the protein-rich remains of dead animals, but even that could help unbalance the native ecosystem by usurping the food supply for native scavengers, like the pueo.

Luckily, human intervention can reduce the impact, unlike with the ants, which are so far beyond control. By poisoning or in some cases digging out the nests, the pressure on native species is reduced, and Wilson’s research showed the natives are able to make a comeback in areas freed of wasps.

She determined what they were eating by analyzing DNA from their prey. The yellowjackets are not aggressive toward humans unless the nest is disturbed. In the western states, they prefer higher elevations and avoid people, so that they do not cause much trouble, except sometimes in orchards.

“The hard part is to find them,” she says. Digging or poisoning “is not a perfect solution,” but it offers some solace.

Wilson is concerned about the native solitary bees and wasps, particularly the yellow-faced bee, which not only have their nectar taken but are attacked in the air by the yellowjackets and in the soil by the ants.

The vast numbers of yellowjackets are changing the ecological working of Hawaii’s ohia forests and subalpine shrublands, Wilson said.

The yellowjackets are now eating food from 14 orders of animals. The adults mainly consume nectar but need protein to feed to their larvae. Besides lizards and birds, they go for tree lice and juicy caterpillars and spiders and a wide range of other arthropods. “They’re just like little vacuum cleaners,” she said.

Being flexible as to dinner can help explain why some invaders become invasive, the report says, but less attention has been paid to how a new environment can alter the invader’s behavior. “It’s a fascinating system,” Wilson said.

She is lead author of the paper, which is part of her dissertation. The co-authors are UCSD professor David Holway and Lynne Mullen, a former UCSD graduate student now attending Harvard.

Now that Wilson has her degree, she is looking for work. She has several grant applications pending and hopes some of them bring her back to the islands.

“Some of the stimulus money is trickling down, finally,” she said Monday.

* Harry Eagar can be reached at heagar@mauinews.com.

Hello world!

July 20, 2009

Aloha, nko.org has now started this blog using our new iPhone3GS and will be posting in the field.